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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
would be seeing wall-to-wall coverage of one of the most exciting finishes to a presidential election in the television age. we are not going to see as much of that, certainly through the weekend. which means whichever candidate was going to benefit more from national coverage is going to lose paired to what it would have been like. >> rose: we conclude this evening, focusing on politics with nate silver, founder of "the new york times" blog 538.com. >> i mean ohio is a swing state for a reason, is that it resembles the united states, rural areas and suburban areas, you could certainly have a case where romney wins the popular vote by one point and obama wins ohio and iowa by one point that is possible, maybe a one or two-point shift but there is almost no way to look at the history of this country or try to do the more complex things, the mathematical models unlikely to have romney win the popular and have him lose the electorial college. >> rose: the sites and sounds of hurricane sandy, mark halperin and nate silver when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the foll
.s. presidential election, a new jobs report is fueling arguments on the campaign trail. it seems to have something for everyone. president obama is time-outing that more jobs were -- touting that more jobs have been created than were expected. romney says the overall elm ploit rate is actually up. now starts the weekend blitz and the bbc's adam brooks has been watching the reaction for us. >> the voter in the state of ohio -- >> in 2008 we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. today our businesses have created nearly 5 1/2 million new jobs and this morning we learned the companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. >> new jobs were created in america in october. 171,000 of them, many in health care, retail and business services. many more people returned to the workforce, possibly a sign of economic optimism. but still these are not numbers to excite a tired and skittish electorate. mitt romney, campaigning in wisconsin, trying to erode mr. obama's support in the midwest. he took the job's numbers as support f
? >> the question of this election comes down to this -- do you want more of the same or do you want real change and we want real change. >> we know what change looks like. and what the governor's offering ain't it. gwen: the polls can't predict it. the crowds can't guarantee it and even the early voters can't. >> it ended in the great recession of 2008. >> we know what this movie looks like at the end of the movie. turn on the tv and look at europe. >> a toss-up election, complete with its own october surprise. unpredictable, political embraces. >> if they need something, we figure out a way to say yes. >> i cannot thank the president enough for his personal concern and compassion for our state and for the people of our state. gwen: then today, 171,000 new jobs adds to mostly good economic news. now, it's up to you. covering the week jackie comes of the "new york times." john harwood of cnbc and the "new york times" and amy walter of abc news. >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. produ
like at the end of the movie. turn on the tv and look at europe. >> a toss-up election, complete with its own october surprise. unpredictable, political embraces. >> if they need something, we figure out a way to say yes. >> i cannot thank the president enough for his personal concern and compassion for our state and for the people of our state. gwen: then today, 171,000 new jobs adds to mostly good economic news. now, it's up to you. covering the week jackie comes of the "new york times." john harwood of cnbc and the "new york times" and amy walter of abc news. >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. produced in association with national journal. corporate funding is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. to connect our forces to what they need when they need it. >> to help troops see danger before it sees them. >> to answer the call of the brave and bring them safely home. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to support and protect all who ser
to canceled flights, the federal response and potential election impact. we'll have all that and more right here on nbr! >> tom: hurricane sandy is now super-storm sandy as it clashes with another weather system, bringing wind, rain, and snow to parts of the mid-atlantic and northeastern u.s. she has cut a path of destruction, flooding, and massive power outages as the death toll from the storm stands at 17 across seven states. even as sandy makes her way to canada, the destruction is devastating. high winds pushed the atlantic ocean up and over seawalls, flooding entire neighborhoods. the wind and water teamed up to cut power to millions of people along the eastern seaboard. the storm surge even continued today as sandy tracked through western pennsylvania and new york state. the storm has affected an estimated one out of every five americans, bringing some business to a standstill over flooding, closed airports, and no public transportation. while rescue efforts continue tonight, early damage estimates are still rough, running between $10 billion and $20 billion, according to eqecat. hurr
money 2012" initiative. >> the supreme court put elections in the hands of corporations and big money. >> it doesn't corrupt the process; it's necessary for the process. >> what does that say about democracy, though? >> it says that this is completely irrelevant information that only some left-wing nut jobs care about. >> marketplace's kai ryssdal uncovers startling new evidence of outside interest groups' influence on campaigns. >> i found these buckets of documents. >> we have boxes and folders full of candidate signatures being faxed to western tradition partnership. >> i'm literally not going to comment on them. >> i would say we had grounds to proceed with an investigation and put people under oath. >> how secret big money is changing american politics state by state. tonight frontline, "big sky, big money." >> frontlinis made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, a
. >> this could be the year that digital strategies decide what is shaping up to be a razor-close election, but who is watching us and how much do they know about us? >> ifill: jeffrey brown talks with author bill ivey about his prescription for remaking america's democracy. >> well, i think what we need is to rediscover progressive values and put them forward. i'm arguing for not bigger government but i think different government. >> woodruff: and scott schaefer of public television's kqed profiles a photographer who uses google's street view images to create art. >> you have this distinct feeling of decay. the images almost challenge the viewer. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... friends of the newshour. and... this program was made possible by the co
after touring the damage yesterday. his opponent mitt romney is in virginia. with the election just five days away, cautiously, politicians are moving on. >> he used to make the space where he would scrunch up his face -- >> but others never will. she lost her son to the storm. jacob was 23. he and a friend were crushed by falling tree. >> he kept calling me every 20 minutes, and finally, -- i kept calling him every 20 minutes, and finally, a man answered his phone, and i asked who he was. he said he was detective simon, and i asked where my son was, and he asked my address, said he wanted to come to my apartment. >> the lights are out. the power gone. in manhattan alone, 750,000 people are without electricity. every day that passes, businesses are losing money. >> i have never seen anything like it. look at this. what a mess. >> do you have power? >> do i have power? no, i am in the dark. >> there is one ray of light, and it is underground. the new york subway began offering restricted service this morning, allowing some commuters to take their usual journey, but it will be many months
, with the final data before election day now out, we look at the overall jobs picture in america, and how the candidates are and are not addressing it. >> woodruff: then, long gas lines, continuing power outages, and massive cleanup efforts in the northeast. ray suarez updates the slow climb back after the storm. >> brown: ordinary citizens, some of them school children, caught in the crossfire in syria's war. margaret warner has our report. >> as syrian rebels expand the areas they control, the assad regime has turned to long-range artillery and air attacks to hit the opposition and civilians as well. >> woodruff: we have a "battleground" dispatch from iowa, where immigration is rarely mentioned by the candidates, but is on the minds of voters. >> although latinos make up only 5% of iowa's population, their numbers have increased by 110% over the last ten years. >> brown: plus mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> intel >> support also comes from carnegie c
>> announcer: the following is a pbs election 2012 special presentation made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> narrator: tonight, it's the most expensive presidential campaign in american history. with a barrage of negative ads -- >> we can't afford four more years -- >> narration: and court battles over voter eligibility. finally, you get to choose. will either candidate's plan actually work? from the pbs newshour, frontline, washington week, and need to know, this is "election 2012: what's at stake." >> announcer: from the tisch wnet studios in new york, hari sreenivasan. >> thanks for joining us. tonight we are going to do something different. combining the resources of pbs's news and public affairs programs, we are going to look beyond election day and examine how barack obama and mitt romney plan to fix some of america's most serious problems. the stakes could not be much higher. nearly five years after the start of the great recession, more than 20 million americans are unemployed or under-employed. the national de
, which has taken a bit of a pause in sandy's aftermath. with the election only a week away, the devastating east coast storm forced both candidates off the stump today. they focused, instead, on disaster relief, with mitt romney in ohio collecting canned foods and bottled water, and the president making a quick afternoon visit to red cross headquarters in washington. >> the most important message i have for them is that america is is with you. we are standing behind you, and we are going to do everything we can to help you get back on your feet. >> ifill: romney also spoke of the need to help storm victims. >> i appreciate your generosity. it's part of the american spirit. the american way to give to people who are in need. and your generosity this morning touches my heart. >> ifill: the romney campaign announced he will resume campaigning tomorrow. the president will remain off the trail through wednesday. he spent most of today at the white house offering federal support to officials in the affected areas. among them, new jersey's republican governor chris christie, a rom
two fridays before the election and according to the app on my iphone, we have 10 days, 23 hours, 15 minutes and 53 seconds before the polls close. accord dog every one of what seems like a thousand polls taken this week, this thing say true dead heat. so what are the candidates up to? they are releasing new ads every day. it's said that character is what we do when no one is looking. mitt romney thought no one was looking when he attacked 47% of americans. his company shipped jobs overseas. >> higher deficits, chronic unemployment, a president who admits he can't work with congress. >> you can't change washington from the inside. >> but he says he's had only four years. that's all mitt romney needed. he turned massachusetts around. turned the deficit into a rainy kay -- day fund. >> and they are crisscrossing the nation, attracting huge crowds in one or the other of eight key battleground states in search of a break out message. >> there is no more serious message in the presidential campaign than who can you trust? trust matters. who is going to look out for you? and here's the thi
days before the election, this was barack obama's chance to show it. he traveled to new jersey, the state that was in the eye of the superstore, to see the damage. >> for those like the people i just had the chance to meet whose lives have been up and it, my second message is, we are here for you. we will not forget, we will follow up to make sure that you get all the help that you need until it you rebuild. >> at his side, new jersey straight jersey republican -- at his side, new jersey republican governor chris christie. what the president found was scenes of utter devastation. this was seaside heights. the homes had been destroyed. this is the mangled metal of what was an amusement park. in new jersey, across the hudson river from manhattan, we found waterfront neighbors cut off. some attempted it the watery drive. he did not make it to the other side. this man told me he would have to climb out through the car window. he would have to take photographs of the insurance company. those without power bedded down for a second night in shelters. we met tiffany phillips who was fo
heed the warning to stay indoors. and with just weeks away until election day, sandy sends the presidential contest for a loop. no one wants to play politics in this storm. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. hurricane sandy, one of the biggest storms ever to hit the united states, is bearing down on the east coast. nine states stretching from north carolina to connecticut have declared a state of emergency. 50 million people live in the storm's path. usually bustling cities have been brought to a stand still. this is the scene in manhattan where a crane is dangling from a 65-story building. >> it's a monday morning in manhattan unlike any other. the city that's supposed to never sleep is eerily quiet, awaiting the storm. subway stopped. even wall street not trading. the -- >> we're used to coming down and the water calm, much, much slower. it's over the banks and the storm hasn't gotten here. it makes me nervous. >> the impact of hurricane sandy is starting to be felt. high winds and crashing waves along the east coast. >> good m
system suffers major damage. and with just one week to go until election day, how how the storm shaken up the presidential race? welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe. it is called a super storm, and sandy lived up to her building. tonight, new jersey homeowners are still reeling from the massive damage. and millions on the east coast do not have electricity, and normally booming cities are at a standstill. 33 people have reportedly been killed. >> the destructive power of the super storm unleashed after dark as sandy made landfall. the flooding was instant, the scale shocking. the storm arrived with high tide in new york harbor, creating a surge of nearly 14 feet. subway tunnels flooded. the water engulfed the construction site at ground zero. manhattan was plunged into darkness. electricity generators and exploded in spectacular fashion. >> what is going on? i don't know what is going on. >> oh, my god. >> many cars were damaged by falling trees and high winds. >> 0, my god. my car. >> patients were evacuated from the hospital that lost po
of economic growth?" and so, the problem now facing the country and the candidates is we're going to elect a candidate who is going to govern by asking us to make choices that we haven't anticipated. and as a result, we're going to feel betrayed to some extent, even if we voted for that candidate. >> the debates were the most watched in a long time. your field intersects politics and entertainment. do you think entertainment values had something to do with this? >> well, i think suspense was what was required down to the wire. and that's what we got. one won one, another won another. then a couple of draws. what could be better for keeping people watching? unfortunately, the lack of an answer to who sacrifices what is only the beginning of an endless list that, for me, is a reason to be disappointed, not just in the debates, but in the entire campaign. i want to find out about things that are important, about plutocracy taking over democracy, the widening gulf between the powerful and the powerless. wall street, global warming, on and on. at most, they made a cameo appearance during the de
the election. u.s. businesses added 171,000 jobs in october across many industries. four days after sandy, the gas crunch in jersey, access to cash in the northeast and controversy nixes sunday's running of the new york city marathon. that and more tonight on "n.b.r.!" we begin with jobs. employers beefed up their payrolls last month, adding more jobs than expected as more americans counted themselves among the labor force. the official labor department count shows 171,000 jobs were created last month. that's much stronger than the 125,000 analysts were looking for. and the government revised its september new job count up to 148,000. thanks to more people looking for work, the unemployment rate rose slightly to 7.9%. darren gersh has the story from washington d.c. >> reporter: the october employment report makes it clear a jobs recovery is solidly underway. >> i think the key message there is that employment growth has been taken up a notch. over the last three months we've added over 170,000 jobs on average. that's a little bit better than what we've been seeing. that is enough over the
election day. we get an update. >> we know what change looks like. and what the governor's offering sure ain't change. >> we need a president who understands business, and i do. that's why i will be able to get this economy going. >> woodruff: we have two takes on the battle for the u.s. senate, beginning with the big money being spent in the most competitive races. we talk with npr's tamara keith. >> brown: and from arizona, we have the story of a former surgeon general challenging a six-term congressman for an open seat. >> woodruff: plus on the daily download, margaret warner looks at another way to reach out to voters with last minute messages on twitter. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the losses in
, and the election. president obama suspended campaigning to oversee the government's storm response. governor mitt romney canceled campaign events in the key states of virginia and new hampshire. darren gersh tonight looks at the impact with election day one week away. >> reporter: both campaigns say they have stopped fundraising and campaigning in states in sandy's path. governor romney was still looking for votes today in ohio, iowa and wisconsin, but his campaign says he will stay away from the key swing states of virginia and new hampshire to let emergency workers there focus on the storm. both candidates say this is a time for the nation to come together. >> i am not worried at this point about the impact on the election. i'm worried about the impact on families, and i'm worried about the impact on our first responders. i'm worried about the impact on our economy and on transportation. the election will take care of itself next week. >> i would like to ask you who are here today to think about making a contribution to the red cross or another relief agency, to be of help if you possibly can i
election campaigning. it has been a shock to a country built on a belief in man's destiny to create a better world, but there are limits. mark was in the united states to see the devastation firsthand. >> welcome to hoboken, a poor city on the new jersey side of the hudson. places like this felt the worst of it and by the time we got there the water had already fallen by four feet. on the heights above power lines had been brought down across the street, bringing life to a halt. >> nobody was ready for this. this has never happened before, ever. i mean, it was devastating. all over. i have a house down the jersey shore that's underwater, they tell me. >> it's the jersey coast that took the worst battering. here the epicenter of the storm hit pulling buildings apart and sweeping the beach right over the community. >> the waves are coming, hitting on an angle from the south and just breaking over the seawall, pouring into the houses up front here and then into the streets. so i stayed up on the top, watched the incredible power of the ocean, then the full moon came out for about 15 mi
% of wisconsin's eligible voters went to the polls in the last few presidential elections, the second highest tally in the country. so, naturally, politics and packers mix. democratic congresswoman tammy baldwin, herself in a tight race for an open senate seat, was here to boost her party's chances. >> we're here at lambeau field, where thousands of people are flocking in to enjoy a great football game. but also just reminding people about their solemn duty to vote, as citizens. and we have a big focus in the final days on getting out the vote. >> reporter: on the other side, republican senator ron johnson had joined up with romney-ryan campaign bus. >> this thing is going to go right down to the wire. i'm cautiously optimistic about it. >> reporter: in fact, barack obama won this state handily in 2008 he was well ahead here this year until the first debate, when mitt romney gained ground. >> when mitt romney led bain, hundreds of plants, factories, and stores were shuttered. workers saw their wages slashed, their jobs sent overseas. >> look at the evidence of the last four years. under the p
next week's election. >> tom: tomorrow on "n.b.r." its the nation's financial capital, we look at the challenges and cost of getting new york city moving again. >> susie: all of this is happening on hallowee. that's nightly business report for wednesday, october 31, halloween, have a good and safe evening everyone. >> tom: goodnight susie, we'll see you online at: www.nbr.com and back here tomorrow night. captioning sponsored by wpbt captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> join us anytime at nbr.com. there, you'll find full episodes of the program, complete show transcripts and all the market stats. also follows us on our facebook page at bizrpt. and on twitter @bizrpt.
brings us back to the huge roll that federal policy now plays in the economy. after the election, lawmakers have a chance to boost the economy by reaching an agreement to extend expiring tax cuts and ease looming spending cuts; or they can jump off the so-called fiscal cliff and see if the economy follows. darren gersh, nbr, washington. >> tom: retail sales moved higher in october as retailers closed their books on the month before sandy rushed ashore. macy's surprised with a better than expected 4% sales gains; kohl's and target also fared well. warehouse store costco was up 5%, while nordstrom was the standout. the high-end retailer posting a near 10% sales gain. >> susie: and auto sales moved higher in october, despite hurricane sandy crimping sales in the final days of the month. sales at g.m. rose almost 5% on strength in its cadillac and buick brands. at ford, sales barely budged, up just four tenths of a percent. the auto maker believes the massive storm cost the industry as many as 25,000 sales in the last three days of the month. chrysler was up 10%, led by its ram picku
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)